Game of Thrones Missed an Immense Opportunity by Ignoring Its Characters

I have  expressed my qualms about seasons seven and eight of Game of Thrones in the past. But I’m not here to complain about shoddy battle tactics, “jet-packing” characters, or the abhorrent lack of dire wolves in recent seasons.

No, today my gripe is with a much more fundamental narrative thread, and the show’s utter ignorance of it in Sunday’s episode.

Beware… Here be spoilers!

Continue reading “Game of Thrones Missed an Immense Opportunity by Ignoring Its Characters”

Don’t Sweat the First Draft

Writing the first draft of your manuscript is tough. I think it’s easily the hardest part of the entire publishing process. Not only are you trying to create a plot with authentic characters in a believable setting, but you want it to sound good. There’s a constant pressure to write something worthwhile, for you and for your future readers.

However, there is one thing I constantly have to remind myself of before I get bogged down in perfecting my first draft: don’t sweat it so much.

Continue reading “Don’t Sweat the First Draft”

5 Reasons Wattpad is Great for Writers

As some of you may already know, I’ve started publishing a series of short myths on Wattpad this year.

I’ve done my best to remain active on Wattpad, rather than just pushing Publish and logging out. After several months of pretty consistent use of this social writing platform, I wanted to highlight some of the things I think it does well. Continue reading “5 Reasons Wattpad is Great for Writers”

Using Side Characters to Provide Perspective

Perspective can be one of the most important aspects of writing an in-depth, detailed narrative, especially when world building is a big part of your writing.

World building is the reason I started writing.

So, that means sometimes I want to write about the story underneath the plot–the cultural or historical context, even if it just pertains to one character’s arc. Continue reading “Using Side Characters to Provide Perspective”

A Writing Routine Requires A Life Routine

February has been an up-an-down month, if you hadn’t already guessed, and it’s this kind of sudden change (“Life Events”, as your friendly HR department refers to them) that can throw any decent writing routine completely off course.

Finally, however, I think I’ve found a way to keep writing during this vaguely temporary period of unemployment. Continue reading “A Writing Routine Requires A Life Routine”

Why I Love Myths… and Decided to Write Them

I’ve been talking more and more about the mythology series I have been writing for my fantasy universe. I’m pretty excited about these stories, so I think it’s time I shared why this kind of story is important to me.

I could make this a listicle, but I don’t want to. Follow me on this journey!

Continue reading “Why I Love Myths… and Decided to Write Them”

Introduce Your Characters in their Element

Writing introductory sections is hard. I struggle to write intros to my blog posts sometimes.

Okay, a lot of times.

But I’ve picked up on one key way to introduce characters to the reader in a new story: introduce your character in their element.

Continue reading “Introduce Your Characters in their Element”

Another 3 Things I’ve Learned from Publishing My First Novel

Well, the learning curve continues to grow with my “published author” status. I’ve been mum on this for a while, honestly because I was a bit embarrassed about it.

But, I might as well confess: I’m revising and re-publishing The Warden of Everfeld: Memento.

Continue reading “Another 3 Things I’ve Learned from Publishing My First Novel”

7 Things I’ve Learned from Self-Publishing My First Novel

The pre-order period for The Warden of Everfeld: Memento officially ended last Wednesday, which means it’s time for a little retrospective on how this 30-day marketing binge went for me.

Here are 7 things I’ve learned from self-publishing my first novel, so far. Continue reading “7 Things I’ve Learned from Self-Publishing My First Novel”

Using History as a Story’s Backbone

Over the last few years, I’ve managed to cultivate a few writing practices which help me build my stories. While on an extended weekend vacation, I went back to an old gem and rediscovered its virtues: history.

And no, I don’t mean actually studying real history to tell my own stories, although I also enjoy that. I’m talking about writing history. Continue reading “Using History as a Story’s Backbone”